popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale
popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale__right
popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale__left
popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale__below
popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale__front
popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale__after

Description

Product Description

Pulitzer Prize–winning literary critic Michiko Kakutani shares 100 personal, thought-provoking essays about books that have mattered to her and that help illuminate the world we live in today—with beautiful illustrations throughout.

“A book tailormade for bibliophiles.”—Oprah Winfrey

“An ebullient celebration of books and reading.”—Publishers Weekly (starred review)


In the introduction to her new collection of essays, Ex Libris: 100+ Books to Read and Reread, Michiko Kakutani writes: “In a world riven by political and social divisions, literature can connect people across time zones and zip codes, across cultures and religions, national boundaries and historical eras. It can give us an understanding of lives very different from our own, and a sense of the shared joys and losses of human experience.”
 
Readers will discover novels and memoirs by some of the most gifted writers working today; favorite classics worth reading or rereading; and nonfiction works, both old and new, that illuminate our social and political landscape and some of today’s most pressing issues, from climate change to medicine to the consequences of digital innovation. There are essential works in American history ( The Federalist Papers, The Writings and Speeches of Martin Luther King, Jr.); books that address timely cultural dynamics (Elizabeth Kolbert’s The Sixth Extinction, Daniel J. Boorstin’s The Image, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale); classics of children’s literature (the Harry Potter novels, Where the Wild Things Are); and novels by acclaimed contemporary writers like Don DeLillo, William Gibson, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Ian McEwan.

With richly detailed illustrations by lettering artist Dana Tanamachi that evoke vintage bookplates, Ex Libris is an impassioned reminder of why reading matters more than ever.

Review

“Former  New York Times book critic Kakutani delivers an ebullient celebration of books and reading. She comes up with an eclectic list of titles that have shaped her life, including classics (Shakespeare,  FrankensteinMoby-Dick), biography and memoir . . . and contemporary fiction (Zadie Smith’s  White Teeth, Donna Tartt’s  The Goldfinch, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie’s  Americanah). Each selection is accompanied by a brief, elegant essay explaining her connection to the work. . . . Kakutani’s recommendations and her ‘sense of the shared joys and losses of human experience’ are revelations.” —Publishers Weekly (starred review)

About the Author

Michiko Kakutani, the former chief book critic of  The New York Times, is the author of the 2018 bestseller  The Death of Truth: Notes on Falsehood in the Age of Trump.
 
Dana Tanamachi is a lettering artist and designer who specializes in custom typography and illustration. She has been commissioned by Target, Nike, USPS, Ralph Lauren, Instagram, West Elm,  O: The Oprah Magazine, and  Time.

Excerpt. © Reprinted by permission. All rights reserved.

Introduction

As a child, the Pulitzer Prize–winning playwright August Wilson recalled in a speech that he was the one in his family who wanted to read all the books in the house, who wore out his library card and kept books way past their due date. He dropped out of high school at age fifteen, but spent every school day at the Carnegie Library of Pittsburgh reading history and biography and poetry and anthropology. The library would eventually give him an honorary high school diploma, and the books he discovered there, he said, “opened a world that I entered and have never left,” and led to the transformative realization that “it was possible to be a writer.”

Dr. Oliver Sacks credited the local public library he knew as a child (in Willesden, London) as the place where he received his real education, just as Ray Bradbury described himself as “completely library educated.” In the case of two famous autodidacts, Abraham Lincoln and Frederick Douglass, the books they read growing up indelibly shaped their ideals and ambitions, and gave them the tools of language and argument that would help them shape the history of their nation.

The pleasure of reading, Virginia Woolf wrote, is “so great that one cannot doubt that without it the world would be a far different and a far inferior place from what it is. Reading has changed the world and continues to change it.” In fact, she argued, the reason “we have grown from apes to men, and left our caves and dropped our bows and arrows and sat round the fire and talked and given to the poor and helped the sick—the reason why we have made shelter and society out of the wastes of the desert and the tangle of the jungle is simply this—we have loved reading.”

In his 1996 book, A History of Reading, Alberto Manguel described a tenth-century Persian potentate who reportedly traveled with his 117,000-book collection loaded on the backs of “four hundred camels trained to walk in alphabetical order.” Manguel also wrote about the public readers hired by Cuban cigar factories in the late nineteenth century to read aloud to workers. And about the father of one of his boyhood teachers, a scholar who knew many of the classics by heart and who volunteered to serve as a library for his fellow inmates at the Nazi concentration camp Sachsenhausen. He was able to recite entire passages aloud—much like the book lovers in Fahrenheit 451, who keep knowledge alive through their memorization of books.

Why do we love books so much?

These magical brick-sized objects—made of paper, ink, glue, thread, cardboard, fabric, or leather—are actually tiny time machines that can transport us back to the past to learn the lessons of history, and forward to idealized or dystopian futures. Books can transport us to distant parts of the globe and even more distant planets and universes. They give us the stories of men and women we will never meet in person, illuminate the discoveries made by great minds, and allow us access to the wisdom of earlier generations. They can teach us about astronomy, physics, botany, and chemistry; explicate the dynamics of space flight and climate change; introduce us to beliefs, ideas, and literatures different from our own. And they can whisk us off to fictional realms like Oz and Middle-earth, Narnia and Wonderland, and the place where Max becomes king of the wild things.

When I was a child, books were both an escape and a sanctuary. I was an only child, accustomed to spending lots of time alone. I read in the cardboard refrigerator carton that my father had turned into a playhouse by cutting a door and windows in the sides. I read under the blankets at night with a flashlight. I read in the school library during recess in hopes of avoiding the playground bullies. I read in the backseat of the car, even though it made me carsick. And I read at the dining room table: because my mother thought books and food were incompatible, I would read whatever happened to be at hand—cereal boxes, appliance manuals, supermarket circulars, the ingredients of Sara Lee’s pecan coffee cake or an Entenmann’s crumb cake. I read the recipe for mock apple pie on the back of the Ritz crackers box so many times I could practically recite it. I was hungry for words.

The characters in some novels felt so real to me, when I was a child, that I worried they might leap out of the pages at night, if I left the cover of the book open. I imagined some of the scary characters from L. Frank Baum’s Oz books—the Winged Monkeys, say, or the evil Nome King, or Mombi the witch who possesses the dangerous Powder of Life—escaping from the books and using my bedroom as their portal into the real world, where they might wreak havoc and destruction.

Decades before binge-watching Game of Thrones, Breaking Bad, and The Sopranos, I binge-read Nancy Drew mysteries, Black Stallion novels, Landmark biographies, even whole sections of the World Book Encyclopedia (which is how my father fine-tuned his English, when he first moved to the United States from Japan).

In high school and college, I binge-read books about existentialism ( The Stranger, No Exit, Notes from Underground, Irrational Man, Either/Or, The Birth of Tragedy), black history ( The Autobiography of Malcolm X; The Fire Next Time; Manchild in the Promised Land; Black Like Me; Black Skin, White Masks); and science fiction and dystopian fiction ( 1984, Animal Farm, Dune, The Illustrated Man, and Fahrenheit 451, Childhood’s End, A Clockwork Orange, Cat’s Cradle). My reading was in no way systematic. At the time, I was not even aware of why I gravitated toward these books—though, in retrospect, as one of the few nonwhite kids at school, I must have been drawn to books about outsiders who were trying to figure out who they were and where they belonged. Even Dorothy in Oz, Alice in Wonderland, and Lucy in Narnia, I later realized, were strangers in strange lands, trying to learn how to navigate worlds where few of the usual rules applied.

In those pre-internet days, I don’t remember exactly how we heard about new books and authors or decided what to read next. As a child, I think I first heard of Hemingway, Robert Penn Warren, James Baldwin, and Philip Roth because there were articles by or about them (or maybe photos) in Life or Look magazine. I read Rachel Carson’s Silent Spring because my mother was reading it, and T. S. Eliot’s poetry because my favorite high school teacher, Mr. Adinolfi, had us memorize “The Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock.” I was one of those readers who experienced many things first through books—and only later, in real life, not the other way around.

“You read something which you thought only happened to you,” James Baldwin once said, “and you discovered it happened 100 years ago to Dostoyevsky. This is a very great liberation for the suffering, struggling person, who always thinks that he is alone. This is why art is important.”

The books I write about in these pages include some longtime favorites ( A Wrinkle in Time, Moby-Dick, The Palm at the End of the Mind), some older books that illuminate our troubled politics today ( The Paranoid Style in American Politics, The Origins of Totalitarianism, The Federalist Papers), some well-known works of fiction that have continued to exert a formative influence on successive generations of writers ( Winesburg, Ohio; As I Lay Dying; The Odyssey), works of journalism and scholarship that address some of the most pressing issues of our day ( The Forever War, The Sixth Extinction, Dawn of the New Everything), works that shine a light on hidden corners of our world or the human mind ( Arctic Dreams, Lab Girl, The Man Who Mistook His Wife for a Hat), and books that I’ve frequently given or recommended to friends.

Some of my favorite classics are here, but there are lots of lists out there of must-read classics, not to mention the class syllabi we remember from high school and college. And so, I’ve also tried to include a lot of recent books—novels, stories, and memoirs by contemporary writers, and nonfiction works about how technology and political and cultural upheavals are bringing tectonic changes to our world.

Like all lists and anthologies, the selections here are subjective and decidedly arbitrary. It was difficult to whittle my choices down to a hundred (which is why some entries actually contain more than one book), and I could easily have added another hundred books that are equally powerful, moving, or timely.

Over the years, I had the good fortune to have some inspiring teachers who enriched my understanding and appreciation of books. And some wonderful editors—like The New York Times’s former managing editor Arthur Gelb, a mentor to many of us and a journalist equally at home in the world of culture and the world of breaking news—who made it possible for me to make a living for many years by reading.

In these pages, I’m writing less as a critic than as an enthusiast. I’m not trying to explicate hidden meanings in these books or situate them in a literary continuum; I’m trying to encourage you to read or reread these books, because they deserve as wide an audience as possible. Because they are affecting or timely or beautifully written. Because they teach us something about the world or other people or our own emotional lives. Or simply because they remind us why we fell in love with reading in the first place.

Product information

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.
UP NEXT
CANCEL
00:00
-00:00
Shop
Text Message
Email
Facebook
Twitter
WhatsApp
Pinterest
Share
More videos
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who bought this item also bought

Customer reviews

4.5 out of 54.5 out of 5
385 global ratings

Top reviews from the United States

Amazon Customer
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Could have been a really good book
Reviewed in the United States on December 17, 2020
The author''s use of every aspect of the English language, her exceptional vocabulary, and her ability to so graphically describe or explain her point, make this an instructive and enjoyable read. The topic - of summarizing the best of books also makes it worth reading. The... See more
The author''s use of every aspect of the English language, her exceptional vocabulary, and her ability to so graphically describe or explain her point, make this an instructive and enjoyable read. The topic - of summarizing the best of books also makes it worth reading. The summaries are a bit shorter than needed to move the read into the really good category, but another flaw in the writing which also keeps it in the 3 star range is the author''s continuing exhibition of Trump Dersngement Syndrome. She sees Trump''s shortcomings in so many books, some written decades ago, and describes them with generalities that advertise her Syndrome. Should have left these political views out.
26 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Timothy HaughTop Contributor: Baby
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not Much Here
Reviewed in the United States on January 10, 2021
This may be the first time this has ever happened to me, but I’ve finally read a book about books that really disappoints me. The primary reasons I read books like this is to discover books I don’t know, for encouragement to read books I haven’t read, and to have... See more
This may be the first time this has ever happened to me, but I’ve finally read a book about books that really disappoints me.

The primary reasons I read books like this is to discover books I don’t know, for encouragement to read books I haven’t read, and to have a conversation about books I have. Over the course of her brief discussions of 100 books (about 1 – 2 pages for each book), Ms. Kakutani has not left me with any desire to read the books she recommends. Additionally, I find what she has to say about books I know cursory and uninteresting.

She has also succumbed to a problem to often apparent in books written in the past 4 years: the need to talk about Donald Trump. It is problematic enough how often she interprets book themes in terms of what it tells us about Trump, but I started to wonder how many of her selections were made in an effort to satisfy her need to talk about him. Yes, great books do have the ability to comment on our lives today; however, they are so much more. Ms. Kakutani has allowed herself to be corralled into writing a book for this time as opposed to a book for all time.

I don’t think I’m constitutionally capable of passing up a book about books. It is rare, however, for me to finish one without having found inspiration and recommendations for new books to try. Unfortunately, this is one of those rare instances. It’s too bad.
18 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Hande Z
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
The bountiful room
Reviewed in the United States on November 20, 2020
This is not the same as Anne Fadiman’s book with the same title, written about 20 years ago. Fadiman is a long memoir of the books she read and how and why they gave her pleasure. Kakutani’s book is a collection of book reviews. But this is not to say it is inferior or less... See more
This is not the same as Anne Fadiman’s book with the same title, written about 20 years ago. Fadiman is a long memoir of the books she read and how and why they gave her pleasure. Kakutani’s book is a collection of book reviews. But this is not to say it is inferior or less pleasurable to read than Fadiman’s. On the contrary, it is different and yet as pleasurable. No doubt, there are many books with the title or subtitle, ‘100 Books You Must read’, but few can match Kakutani for the vibrancy and warmth with which he describes each book and its author.

Furthermore, rather than focussing on classics only, Kakutani includes modern books by writers such as Don DeLillo and Junot Diaz, lesser known writers like Edwidge Danticat. He also includes non-fiction books such as Edward Luce’s ‘The Retreat of Western Liberalism’.

He also has chapters in which the main subject is the subject – for example, he has four books on Muhammad Ali. Sometimes he has a collection of books by a single author. For example, he has four books by Joseph J Ellis.

But above all, Kakutani has a style that keeps the reader reading to the end. Writing about books by Bruce Chatwin, Kakutani begins with this paragraph: ‘Writers of books, Bruce Chatwin observed in a posthumously published essay, fall into two categories: “the ones who ‘dig in’ and the ones who move.” Among members of the first category, he counted “Flaubert and Tolstoy labouring in their libraries; Zola with a suit of armour alongside his desk; Poe in his cottage; Proust in a cork-lined room.” Among the movers he named “Melville, who was ‘undone’ by his gentlemanly establishment in Massachusetts, or Hemingway, Gogol or Dostoevsky whose lives, whether from choice or necessity, were a headlong round of hotels and rented rooms – and, in the case of the last, a Siberian prison’.

This hardcover edition is printed on exquisite paper and is a joy to hold, and even more to read. Part of that joy is to find what Kakutani has to say about the books in this collection that we have ourselves read, and part of the joy is in chasing the others that he entices us to find.
10 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
A Reader
1.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Printed in China
Reviewed in the United States on December 12, 2020
So disappointed in the book''s printing. The pages are thick and, of course, the book smells awful. This is a book for book lovers and bibliophiles. We love the way a book is constructed. How it feels when it''s held. The enjoyment is more than the read. It''s in the... See more
So disappointed in the book''s printing. The pages are thick and, of course, the book smells awful. This is a book for book lovers and bibliophiles. We love the way a book is constructed. How it feels when it''s held. The enjoyment is more than the read. It''s in the experience with the book. This one should have been printed in North America. A real shame.
5 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Annabelle Adriano
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book for the discerning, voracious, and eclectic reader.
Reviewed in the United States on May 15, 2021
Ms Kakutani''s reviews are similar to the reviews/reminders I do on Goodreads, only mine are for personal consumption. Needless to say, the similarities end there--it''s impossible to match her easy eloquence and literary mileage. Think of this as a mixed bag of... See more
Ms Kakutani''s reviews are similar to the reviews/reminders I do on Goodreads, only mine are for personal consumption. Needless to say, the similarities end there--it''s impossible to match her easy eloquence and literary mileage.

Think of this as a mixed bag of candies. With a few chewy caramels, which appealed to me but left me wanting more, some minty ones which I merely tolerated, and some surprise flavors, which I intend to pursue further. Having said that, this is one of the most attractive, eye-catching books on my shelf—literal eye candy.

I also couldn''t help noticing how intentionally well-represented and politically correct her reading list was though. I think the best part was her introduction, with the all-too familiar impulses and manias of the passionate reader.
Helpful
Report
Michael
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A Delightful Collection Highly Recommended
Reviewed in the United States on December 10, 2020
These essays are beautifully written. They are illuminating, insightful, often moving, give context, and are a delight to read. This anthology is a keeper, and would make a great gift for anyone who cares about books.
2 people found this helpful
Helpful
Report
Kathleen F Lamantia
3.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Not very good
Reviewed in the United States on July 25, 2021
If I had read the Table of Contents before I purchased this, I would never have bought it. Far from being "books to read and reread," this is a list, for the most part, of currently hot authors and topics. Most of her selections will not stand the test of time. If you... See more
If I had read the Table of Contents before I purchased this, I would never have bought it. Far from being "books to read and reread," this is a list, for the most part, of currently hot authors and topics. Most of her selections will not stand the test of time.
If you are really looking for recommendations of books to read again and again in your lifetime, this is most definitely NOT it.
Helpful
Report
Dianne B
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A book for anyone''s collection
Reviewed in the United States on January 13, 2021
The book is beautifully presented with a short synopsis of 100 books, plus exquisite artwork of vintage book plates. It is too small for a coffee table book, but is perfect on a lamp table to have at hand.
One person found this helpful
Helpful
Report

Top reviews from other countries

Dr. M. Brennan
2.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
American
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on May 26, 2021
"covers a rich and vast range of classics, old and new, that will help build a well-rounded reader and citizen of the world. " Well, maybe if you are an American citizen of the world. but the majority of the classics old and new concerns American...See more
"covers a rich and vast range of classics, old and new, that will help build a well-rounded reader and citizen of the world. " Well, maybe if you are an American citizen of the world. but the majority of the classics old and new concerns American history/politics/literature, so the vast range is not particularly relevant or in fact interesting to the reader outside the USA
"covers a rich and vast range of classics, old and new, that will help build a well-rounded reader and citizen of the world. "
Well, maybe if you are an American citizen of the world. but the majority of the classics old and new concerns American history/politics/literature, so the vast range is not particularly relevant or in fact interesting to the reader outside the USA
8 people found this helpful
Report
D
4.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
content
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on December 12, 2020
Nice book Given as a gift and enjoyed by recipient
Nice book Given as a gift and enjoyed by recipient
Report
Tim Marshall
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Read this book!
Reviewed in the United Kingdom on November 25, 2020
Great guide to the best fiction to enjoy.
Great guide to the best fiction to enjoy.
Report
Edoardo Angeloni
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
A great critic of New York Times.
Reviewed in Italy on April 7, 2021
Kakutani analyzes the greatest writers of 1800 and 1900. The representation of expressive art and the strong approach of men as Wallace,King, Rushdie, gives us the sense of our actual life, not is only about the literature. The American culture is still winning, not is only...See more
Kakutani analyzes the greatest writers of 1800 and 1900. The representation of expressive art and the strong approach of men as Wallace,King, Rushdie, gives us the sense of our actual life, not is only about the literature. The American culture is still winning, not is only an exercize of nice style. Important also what is happened between Kakutani and Trump: a relation often very hard, but always lived with deep respect.
Kakutani analyzes the greatest writers of 1800 and 1900. The representation of expressive art and the strong approach of men as Wallace,King, Rushdie, gives us the sense of our actual life, not is only about the literature. The American culture is still winning, not is only an exercize of nice style. Important also what is happened between Kakutani and Trump: a relation often very hard, but always lived with deep respect.
Report
Translate all reviews to English
Sandra
5.0 out of 5 starsVerified Purchase
Wirklich gutes Buch
Reviewed in Germany on April 29, 2021
Sieht nicht nur super im Regal aus, sondern hat mir auch Tipps zum Weiterlesen für Literatur gegeben. Handliches Format, gut geschrieben.
Sieht nicht nur super im Regal aus, sondern hat mir auch Tipps zum Weiterlesen für Literatur gegeben. Handliches Format, gut geschrieben.
Report
Translate review to English
See all reviews
Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

Customers who viewed this item also viewed

Brief content visible, double tap to read full content.
Full content visible, double tap to read brief content.

What other items do customers buy after viewing this item?








Product information

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale

popular Ex outlet sale Libris: 100+ 2021 Books to Read and Reread sale